Frailing

Kelly Frailing

Affiliations
Assistant Professor of Criminology and Justice, Loyola University New Orleans
Areas of Expertise:
  • Law & Courts
  • Criminal Justice
  • Disaster & Emergency

Connect with Kelly

About Kelly

Frailing’s research focuses on two distinct areas. The first, specialty courts and their participants, examines the factors that are important for participants in drug courts and mental health courts to graduate successfully from these programs. The second, crime in disaster, examines the factors that facilitate various types of crime after a disaster as well as useful approaches for disaster crime prevention.

Podcast

Publications

"How Mental Health Courts Function: Outcomes and Observations" International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 33, no. 4 (2010): 207-213.

Describes the reduction in jail days and in positive drug tests for mental health court participants as well as the supportive interactions with the judge during the court sessions that facilitate these desirable outcomes.

"Quiero Hablar con Usted en Espanol, Juez: The Importance of Spanish at a Majority Hispanic Drug Court" (with Diana Carreon). Criminal Justice Policy Review 27, no. 2 (2015): 164-181.

Presents evidence that looting, rape and sexual assault and fraud occurred in the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina, as well as provides explanations for changes in New Orleans’ murder rate in the decade since the storm.

"Changes and Challenges in Crime and Criminal Justice after Disaster" (with Dee Wood Harper and Ronal Serpas). American Behavioral Scientist 59 (2015): 1278-1291.

Presents evidence that looting, rape and sexual assault and fraud occurred in the immediate wake of Hurricane Katrina, as well as provides explanations for changes in New Orleans’ murder rate in the decade since the storm.

Crime and Criminal Justice in Disaster (Carolina Academic Press, 2015).

Presents historic and contemporary evidence that a wide variety of crime, including looting, rape and sexual assault, fraud, corruption hate crime and crime associated with drug markets, occurs in the short and long term wake of disasters, as well as describes criminal justice and related agencies’ responses to these crimes. Provides policy implications for disaster crime prevention and reduction.

In the News

Kelly Frailing quoted on strategies to deal with crime after a natural disaster in Matthew T. Mangino, "The Myth of Lawlessness in the Wake of Disaster" Redwood Falls Gazette, September 8, 2017.
Guest to discuss the importance of being able to speak with a judge in Spanish on Procedural Fairness Blog, Kelly Frailing, September 4, 2015.