Paul

Mark Paul

Postdoctoral Associate, Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity, Duke University
Areas of Expertise:
  • Economic Security
  • Inequality & the Middle Class
  • Race & Ethnicity

About Mark

Mark recently finished his PhD in Economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Mark's research focuses on inequality by race, class and gender, and sustainable economics.

Contributions

Why the U.S. Federal Government Needs to Guarantee Jobs for All Willing Workers

  • Mark Paul
  • William Darity Jr.

No Jargon Podcast

In the News

Darrick Hamilton's research on America's racial wealth gap discussed in Sam Fullwood III, "New Study Takes Aim at Debunking Old Myths about America’s Racial Wealth Gap," Think Progress, May 2, 2018.
Darrick Hamilton quoted on a federal jobs guarantee in David Dayen, "Whether American Can Afford a Job Guarantee Program is Not Up for Debate" The Intercept, April 30, 2018.
Darrick Hamilton quoted on a federal jobs guarantee in Gregory Krieg, "Why a 'federal jobs guarantee' is Gaining Steam with Democrats" CNN, April 26, 2018.
Darrick Hamilton quoted on a federal jobs guarantee in Jonathan Chait, "Democrats are Rushing into a Job Guarantee. It Could be a Huge Mistake." New York Magazine, April 25, 2018.
Darrick Hamilton quoted on a federal jobs guarantee in Gideon Resnick, "How Guaranteeing Jobs Became the Hot New Policy Priority for 2020 Dems" The Daily Beast, April 25, 2018.
Darrick Hamilton quoted on a federal jobs guarantee in Dylan Matthews, "Cory Booker’s New Big Idea: Guaranteeing Jobs for Everyone Who Wants One" Vox, April 20, 2018.
Darrick Hamilton quoted on homeownership and racial wealth inequality in Tanvi Misra, "Does Homeownership Really 'Drive' the Black-White Wealth Gap?" City Lab, April 20, 2018.
"Sanders Gets Environmental Racism," Mark Paul (with Helen Scharber and Anders Fremstad), The Blog, Huffington Post, April 19, 2016.
"Bernie Sanders Gets Environmental Racism and Climate Change," Mark Paul (with Helen Scharber and Anders Fremstad), Economic Intelligence, U.S. News & World Report, March 17, 2016.
"A Job for Everyone," Mark Paul, The Report: Opinion, U.S. News & World Report, October 7, 2016.
"Can Markets Solve Climate Change? This Democratic Socialist Thinks So," Mark Paul, Climate Change, The Nation, April 12, 2016.
"Vox's Tax Calculator is Wildly Misleading -- So We Made a Better One," Mark Paul (with Mark Paul and Emily Stephens), Election 2016, The Nation, April 6, 2016.
"How Much Money Will You Have in Your Pocket under Each Candidate?," Mark Paul (with Emily Stephens and David Rosnick), The Blog, Huffington Post, April 6, 2016.
"Sanders is Fighting to Raise the Wages for Most Black and Latino Workers," Mark Paul, The Blog, Huffington Post, March 24, 2016.
"A Job Should be a Right," Mark Paul, The Blog, Huffington Post, October 7, 2016.
"The Dakota Access Pipeline Doesn't Make Economic Sense," Mark Paul, The Blog, Huffington Post, February 2, 2017.
"DAPL Doesn't Make Economic Sense," Mark Paul, Dollars & Sense, February, 2017.
"Why We Need a Federal Job Guarantee," Darrick Hamilton (with Mark Paul and William Darity Jr.), Jacobin Magazine, Jacobin Magazine, February 4, 2017.

Publications

"Opening the Farm Gate to Women? Sustainable Agriculture in the United States," (with Anders Fremstad), Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts Amherst, September 2016.

Analyzes the relationship between the growth in the number of women farmers and the rise in sustainable agriculture using the US Census of Agriculture. Authors find that the diverse set of principles associated with Community Supported Agriculture results in women selecting into that form of farming, and that the men involved in it may be more supportive of women farmers.

"The Color of Wealth in the Nation's Capital," (with Mark Paul, William Darity Jr., Kilolo Kijakazi, Rachel Marie Brooks Atkins, and Anne E. Price), The Urban Institute, The New School, and the Insight Center for Community Economic Development, 2017.

Explores racial and ethnic differences in net worth, focusing on Black families in Washington, DC, and shows, through a chronicle of their history in the city, how discrimination and systemic racism contributed to today's wealth gap in the nation's capital.