Nagler

Jonathan Nagler

Professor of Politics, New York University
Areas of Expertise:
  • Civic Engagement
  • Media & Public Opinion
  • Voting
  • Race & Ethnicity

Connect with Jonathan

About Jonathan

Nagler’s research focuses on voting behavior and turnout, the impact of the economy and economic inequality on elections, methodology, social media, the Top 2 Primary in California, and Latino voting. His current work explores the impact of economics on elections, as well as the impact of social media on political participation. Nagler is also a co-PI of the NYU Social Media and Political Participation (SMAPP) Lab.

Briefs

Unequal Voter Turnout in U.S. Presidential Elections

  • Jan Leighley

Podcast

Publications

Who Votes Now? Demographics, Issues, Inequality, and Turnout in the United States (with Jan Leighley) (Princeton University Press, 2013).

Compares the demographic characteristics and political views of voters and nonvoters in American presidential elections since 1972 and examines how electoral reforms and the choices offered by candidates influence voter turnout.

"Race-Based versus Issue Voting: A Natural Experiment: The 2001 City of Los Angeles Elections" (with Marisa Abrajano and R. Michael Alvarez). Politics Research Quarterly 58, no. 2 (2005): 203-218.
Questions the theory of racially polarized voting which suggests that race is a primary determinant of vote choice in elections where a minority candidate is pitted against a white candidate. Argues that while voter ethnicity mattered, voters also relied on issues and ideology as factors in their voting choices.
"Unions and Class Bias in the U.S. Electorate, 1964-2004" (with Jan E. Leighley). The Journal of Politics 69, no. 2 (2007): 430-441.
Examines the impact of unions on voter turnout. Assesses the consequences of dramatic changes in union strength and composition of union membership since 1964 for the composition of the U.S. electorate.
"The Hispanic Vote in the 2004 Presidential Election: Insecurity and Moral Concerns" (with Marisa A. Abrajano and R. Michael Alvarez). The Journal of Politics 70, no. 2 (2008): 368-382.
Examines Hispanic voting behavior in the 2004 Presidential election. Argues that, similar to Anglos, issues and ideology were highly influential in the vote choice of Hispanics in the 2004 election, as placed more emphasis on moral values and national security than on domestic issues such as the economy and education.
"Economics, Elections, and Voting Behavior" (with Suzanne Linn and Marco A. Morales), in Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Political Behavior, edited by Jan Leighley (Oxford University Press, 2010).
Summarizes research on the impact of the state of the economy on elections, and considers how voters evaluate the economy in determining their vote.
Who Votes Now? Demographics, Issues, Inequality, and Turnout in the United States (with Jan E. Leighley) (Princeton University Press, 2013).
Compares the demographic characteristics and political views of voters and nonvoters in American presidential elections since 1972 and examines how electoral reforms and the choices offered by candidates influence voter turnout. Argues that persistent class bias in turnout has enduring political consequences, and that it really does matter who votes and who doesn't.

In the News

Jonathan Nagler quoted in Jonathan Wolfe, "Why We Don't Vote" The New York Times, June 25, 2018.
Jonathan Nagler quoted on the political views of voters and non-voters in Benjamin Wallace-Wells, "Sanders, Trump, and the Rise of the Non-Voters" The New Yorker, April 1, 2016.
Jonathan Nagler quoted on the demographic characteristics and political views of voters and nonvoters in Sean McElwee, "The Economy is a Democrat: Why Recent History Shows the Value of a Progressive President" Salon, March 28, 2015.
Jonathan Nagler's research on the relationship between tweeting and elections discussed in Joshua Tucker. Jonathan Nagler, "No, You Can’t Predict U.S. Congressional Election Outcomes with Tweet Shares: But That Doesn’t Mean You Shouldn’t Try," The Washington Post, August 16, 2013.
Jonathan Nagler's research on gaps between voter and non-voter due to class-based issues discussed in Sean McElwee. Jonathan Nagler, "The Income Gap at the Polls," Politico, January 7, 2015.
Jonathan Nagler's research on cross party voters discussed in John Sides. Jonathan Nagler, "California’s Top-Two Primary Hasn’t Lived up to Reformers’ Hopes," The Washington Post, February 11, 2015.
Jonathan Nagler quoted on the motivations behind crossover voting in Mark Z. Barabak, "Conniving by Crossover Voters is More Myth than Threat" Los Angeles Times, February 21, 2015.