Shapiro

Stuart Shapiro

Affiliations
Professor and Director of the Public Policy Program, Bloustein School of Planning and Policy, Rutgers University
Areas of Expertise:
  • Civic Engagement
  • Government Agencies
  • Public Sector Reforms
  • Economic Growth & Innovation

About Stuart

Shapiro is an expert on the regulatory process at both the state and federal level. His research focuses on the role that different parts of the process (such as public participation, economic analysis of regulations, and executive and legislative involvement in the review of regulations) play in affecting the substance of regulations. Much of his work has concluded that the process matters much less than who is in power and making decisions. Prior to coming to Rutgers, Shapiro worked for five years at the Office of Management and Budget in Washington under Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush.

Briefs

Why Do Politicians Pursue Regulatory Reforms?

Podcast

Publications

"What's Wrong with the Back of the Envelope? A Call for Simple (and Timely) Benefit-Cost Analysis" (with Christopher Carrigan). Regulation and Governance 10, no. 1 (2016).

Argues that a simpler analysis of more alternatives conducted earlier in the process can resuscitate it as a tool to inform policy. Offers possible remedies which include intensifying or relaxing subsequent review of proposed rules, which raise the cost of circumventing the reform or lower the cost of following it.

"The Checkered History of Regulatory Reform Since the APA" (with Deanna Moran). N.Y.U. Journal of Legislation and Public Policy 19, no. 1 (2016): 141.

Discusses the failures of four regulatory reform statutes to meaningfully change regulatory policy. By matching the legislative history of these statutes with their actual performance, demonstrates that a lack of true will for regulatory reform in Congress and the presidency has led to loopholes in reform statutes that have subsequently hampered their implementation.

Analysis and Public Policy: Successes, Failures, and Directions for Reform (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016).

Addresses the question of when different forms of comprehensive analysis (cost-benefit analysis, risk assessment, and environmental impact assessment) make a difference in policy decisions.  Finds that law, politics and bureaucracy are the key constraints on analysis and proposes reforms to make analysis more effective.

"Presidents and Process: A Comparison of the Regulatory Process under the Clinton and Bush (43) Administrations" Journal of Law and Politics 23 (2007): 393-475.
Compares data on how two ideologically distinct presidential administrations used the regulatory process. While each administration had very different regulatory goals, the process appears nearly identical under Presidents Clinton and Bush.
"The Paperwork Reduction Act: Research on Current Practices and Recommendations for Reform," Report to the Administrative Conference of the United States, January 31, 2012.
Examines the implementation of the Paperwork Reduction Act which affects every attempt by federal agencies to collect information from the public. The report concluded that the Act has been largely ineffective and should be retooled to focus on the most burdensome collections.
"The Triumph of Regulatory Politics: Benefit-Cost Analysis and Political Salience" (with John Morrall). Regulation and Governance 6, no. 2 (2012): 189-206.
Demonstrates that there is little relationship between the economic analyses used to inform regulatory decisions and the net benefits of the regulation. Instead, political factors appear to have a more significant relationship with regulatory impacts.
The Politics of Regulatory Reform (with Debra Borie-Holtz) (Routledge, 2013).
Uses a unique data set on the volume of regulation in 28 states as well as some detailed case studies to examine why politicians continually propose and enact changes to the process by which regulatory agencies produce regulations. Concludes that these “regulatory reforms” do little to affect regulations but allow legislators and governors to take credit for dealing with the perceived economic impacts of regulation.

In the News

"Trump’s Deregulatory Record Doesn’t Include Much Actual Deregulation," Stuart Shapiro, The Conversation, May 10, 2018.
"Trump’s War on Civil Servants Could Make Us All Casualties," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, February 3, 2018.
"Rutgers Politics Scholar: 3 Major Themes Show How Trump's First Year was Not Normal ," Stuart Shapiro, New Jersey Opinion, January 21, 2018.
"White House Again Focuses on Regulatory Costs, Ignores Benefits," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, October 4, 2017.
"White House Says Now Isn't the Time to Talk Climate Change. Except, It Is.," Stuart Shapiro, Star-Ledger, September 20, 2017.
"Voter Data Request is Illegal, Not Just Controversial," Stuart Shapiro, The Regulatory Review, July 5, 2017.
"Trump is Finding Deregulating as Hard as Regulating," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, June 1, 2017.
"Trump's Climate Order is Just an Opening Bid," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, March 29, 2017.
"White House Immigration Guidance is Executive Overreach," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, March 9, 2017.
"Trump's Refugee Ban is the Perfect ISIS Recruiting Tool," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, January 28, 2017.
"Why White House Released Report on Regulation when No One Was Looking," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, January 4, 2017.
"Why You Can't Just Ignore the CIA Report on Russia Hacking," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, December 15, 2016.
"The Regulations Trump Promised to Repeal, and What He Can Actually Do," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, December 7, 2016.
Stuart Shapiro quoted on the economy in Kathleen Lynn, "How Trump's Presidency Could Affect the Economy" The Record, November 19, 2016.
Stuart Shapiro quoted on states' economic recovery in Nancy Marshall-Genzer, "States Recover, But Can't Go On a Spending Spree" WBEZ 91.5 Chicago, February 19, 2016.
"Why Trump Can't Actually Cut 70 Percent of Regulations," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, October 7, 2016.
"This Election, Can We Really Trust the 'Experts?'," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, September 14, 2016.
"In Economic Speech, Trump Mostly Wrong on Regulations," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, August 12, 2016.
"Why Regulations Were a Convenient Target at the GOP Convention," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, July 22, 2016.
"The Futility of Regulatory Reform," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, May 23, 2016.
"Giving 'Midnight Regulations' an Earlier Bedtime," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, February 11, 2016.
Stuart Shapiro quoted on midnight regulations in Lydia Wheeler, "Window on Obama Regs Closing" The Hill, February 4, 2016.
"How Durable are Obama's Gun Reforms?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, January 19, 2016.
"What New Presidents Can (and Cannot) Do about Regulation," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, December 23, 2015.
"Refugees, Risks, and Record Temperatures," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, December 1, 2015.
"Government Bureaucrats are People, Too," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, November 12, 2015.
"Arguing about the Costs of Regulation, but Ignoring the Benefits," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, November 3, 2015.
"EPA's Ozone Decision is about Politics, and That's OK," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, October 6, 2015.
"Regulating Research in Academia," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, September 29, 2015.
"SCOTUS Says EPA Must Now Consider Costs. Are Benefits Next?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, July 1, 2015.
"Is There a Booby Trap in Roberts's ObamaCare Decision?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, June 29, 2015.
"Why Does It Take So Long to Issue a Regulation?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, May 19, 2015.
Stuart Shapiro quoted on the Michigan v. EPA case in Lydia Wheeler, "EPA Regulations Face New Test at High Court" The Hill, March 24, 2015.
"Did ATF Delay the 'Bullet Ban' Because of Public Outcry?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, March 20, 2015.
"What Can Tobacco Teach Us about Climate Change Policy?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, February 16, 2015.
"Dynamic Scoring and the Power of Numbers," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, January 20, 2015.
"Cromnibus a Sneak Preview for Regulation Wars to Come," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, December 15, 2014.
"In His Second Term, is Obama Weak or Strong?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, December 2, 2014.
"The Regulation Election," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, October 29, 2014.
"Are There Too Many Regulations?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, September 29, 2014.
"How Much is That Regulation in the Window?," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, July 31, 2014.
"Climate Regulations - A Long Road Ahead," Stuart Shapiro, The Hill, July 2, 2014.
Shapiro regularly contributesStuart Shapiro to The Regulatory Review.
"Regulation at the State Level," Stuart Shapiro, Interview with Nancy Marshall-Genzer, NPR’s Marketplace, May 3, 2012.
Guest to discuss the West, Texas fertilizer plant explosion on Fox News’ Alan Colmes Radio Show, Stuart Shapiro, April 22, 2013.