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Mehmet Soyer

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Utah State University
Chapter Member: Utah SSN
Areas of Expertise:

Connect with Mehmet

About Mehmet

Soyer is an environmental sociologist with an interest in social inequality. Soyer's research agenda consists of examining the critical link between community response and the impacts of energy development through collective behavior, activism, and environmental inequality. Soyer is also interested in pedagogical research to work on how to enhance safe and brave spaces for exploring perceptions of marginalized groups.

Contributions

In the News

"Air Quality and Asthma in Cache Valley: Researcher Seeking Participants," Mehmet Soyer, Interview with Erin Cox, Fox 13 Salt Lake City Local News, November 15, 2019.

Publications

Sociological Studies of Environmental Conflict (with Sebahattin Ziyanak and Dian Jordan) (Rowman and Littlefield, 2019).

Discusses how environmental studies about natural resource issues are often studied as conflicts; this book is carefully designed to expound on how resolutions are negotiated and maintained. Outlines that a number of factors influence how conflicts are framed and how resolutions are determined regarding fracking, shared waters and environmental threats. Explores the power, community activism, and politics regarding natural resources.

"The Battle over Fracking: The Mobilization of Local Residents" (with Sebahattin Ziyanak). TQR 23, no. 9 (2018).

Studies the power struggle of two rival groups (Frack Free Denton and Denton Tax Payers for a Strong Economy) over fracking in Denton. Questions how each of these groups challenges the claims-making activities and goals of their adversaries? Finds that the new theoretical framework model is germane to many features of claims,” “claims-makers,” and “claims- making activities.

"Socio-Psychological Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing on Community Health and Well-Being" (with Kylen Kaminski and Sebahattin Ziyanak). Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 4 (2020).

Elaborates that at the core of the hydraulic fracturing (fracking) debate is the level of perceived risk involved with extractive industries, such as the release of toxic and carcinogenic chemicals, increased population growth, and truck traffic. Allows for a more comprehensive understanding of how fracking can impact the socio-psychological well-being of the community.

"Old Town Dentonites”: Community Members’ Competing Constructions of Hydraulic Fracturing and Land Use in Denton, Texas" (with Mollie Murphy, Sebahattin Ziyanak, and Cassidy Gummersall). The Extractive Industries and Society 6, no. 4 (2019): 1333-1339.

Conveyes that Pro- and anti-fracking groups maintained an attachment to and ownership of the local land and engaged in harsh “othering” discourse to describe the opposing group. Contributes to scholarly understandings of the relationship(s) between public perceptions of hydraulic fracturing, land use, and proximity.