Hosto-Marti

Barbara Hosto-Marti

Assistant Professor of Political Science and Social Science Program Director, Lindenwood University
Chapter Member: Confluence SSN
Areas of Expertise:
  • Policy in Other Countries
  • Civic Engagement

About Barbara

Hosto-Marti’s area of expertise is in globalization, civil society, and international governance. Her research looks at how people work together to influence the rules that regulate their behavior at the international level, as well as evaluating which components of globalization make it easier or possibly more difficult for people to work collectively. Another area of her research seeks to identify which features of the international political system contribute to the success or failure of these group efforts.

Contributions

Publications

"Civil Society Engagement: New Associational Real Estate or Participatory Ghetto? – Deciphering the Purpose of CSO and IGO Partnership Programs," International Studies Association Conference, February 28, 2011.
Evaluates the effectiveness of civil society engagement programs of the United Nations, The World Bank, The World Trade Organization, The International Monetary Fund, The European Union, and The North Atlantic Treaty Organization. This paper uses matrix analysis of mission accessibility, how easily can civil society organizations (and the general public) relate to the core mission of the organization, and structural openness, how many opportunities for participation does the international organization offer to civil society organizations.
"The Pursuit of Potential: NGOs and Filling the Democratic Deficit in International Regimes," March 31, 2010.
Explores which elements of NGO/IGO relationship influence the success or failure of civil society’s efforts to influence international policy regimes.
"Cultivation or Co-optation: Understanding the Motives of NGO Participation in International Organizations," Midwest International Studies Association Conference, October 31, 2009.
Explores the influence of globalization on the growth of international nongovernmental organizations over a five year time period. This paper used panel analysis to evaluation the relationship between increasing democratic governance, economic integration, and flow of international development aid and the global growth in the number of non-governmental organizations.