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Clare Daniel

Administrative Assistant Professor of Women's Leadership, Tulane University

About Clare

Daniel's research focuses on the relationships between reproductive politics and social inequality. Daniel is interested in the connections between political discourse, popular media, and advocacy work related to adolescent pregnancy and sexual health education, and how these influence distributions of resources and wealth. Daniel conducts research, teaches, and coordinates programming around reproductive politics in Louisiana at Tulane's Newcomb College Institute.

In the News

"Letters: Amendment 1 Would Hurt Louisiana Families," Clare Daniel, The Advocate, October 14, 2020.
Clare Daniel quoted on the politics surrounding reproductive rights by Will Sentell and Mark Ballard, "From Abortion to Property Taxes, Louisiana Voters Will Decide on These 7 Amendments on Nov. 3" The Advocate, October 11, 2020.
Guest to discuss New Orleans Maternal Child Health Coalition on WHIV ProFrequency, Clare Daniel (with Ashley Hill Hamilton), January 16, 2020.
Guest to discuss New Orleans Maternal and Child Health Coalition on WBOK Good Morning Show, Clare Daniel (with Hali Ledet), 2020.
"Clare Daniel New Books Network Interview," Clare Daniel, Interview with Dr. Lee Pierce, New Books Network, June 11, 2019.
Clare Daniel's research on teen pregnancy, as presented in her 2017 book discussed by Letizia Guglielmo, "Review of Mediating Morality: The Politics of Teen Pregnancy in the Post-Welfare Era," Journal for the History of Children and Youth, April 24, 2019.
"Clare Daniel SHCY Podcast Interview," Clare Daniel, Interview with Jenna Vinson, SHCY Podcast, April 24, 2019.
"Reproductive Rights in Danger on Court," Clare Daniel, The Advocate, July 4, 2018.

Publications

"“Power to Decide” Who Should Get Pregnant: A Feminist Rhetorical Analysis of Neoliberal Visions of Reproductive Justice" (with Jenna Vinson). Present Tense: A Journal of Rhetoric in Society 8, no. 2 (2020).

Analyzes the rebrand of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, demonstrating how institutions can use social change rhetoric to depoliticize that language and reaffirm neoliberal logics. 

"Teen Sex, An Equal-Opportunity Menace: Multicultural Politics in 16 and Pregnant" in MTV and Teen Pregnancy: Critical Essays on 16 and Pregnant and Teen Mom, edited by Letizia Gugliemo (Scarecrow Press, 2013), 79-92.

Examines representations of teen pregnancy in 16 and Pregnant. Argues that the show helps consolidate a shift in the dominant discourse of adolescent reproduction, from an issue primarily associated with societal "ills", such as welfare dependence and urban decay in the 1990s, to one marking the personal and moral perils of teen sexual activity in the first decades of the twenty-first century.

"The Lee Marmon Photographs: Chronicles of the West" (with Claire-Lise Bénaud). Collection Building 32, no. 4 (2013): 133-138.

Documents the acquisition and processing of an important Native American pictorial archive, the Lee Marmon Pictorial Collection, and to elucidate some of its research and cultural value.

"'Taming the Media Monster": Teen Pregnancy and the Neoliberal Safety (Inter)Net" Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 39, no. 4 (2014).

Examines the social-media-based work of the National Campaign, showing the heavily disciplinary and moralizing functions of these strategies and their role within a new construction of social welfare. Argues that these tactics form a redefined notion of the social safety net based on a vision of citizens distributing vital, attractively packaged information among themselves via a privatized cybernetwork in order to maintain social well-being through the cultivation of proper sexual and reproductive behavior.

"Daniel on Briggs, 'Somebody's Children: The Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption'" H-Ethnic (2012).

Reviews "Somebody's Children: The Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption" by Laura Briggs

Mediating Morality: The Politics of Teen Pregnancy in the Post-Welfare Era (University of Massachusetts Press, 2017).

Argues that teen pregnancy, specifically since the radical overhaul of welfare policy in 1996, was previously regarded as a social problem requiring public solutions but now is seen as an individual failure on the part of the teens involved.