Peck

Gunther Peck

Associate Professor of History, Duke University
Areas of Expertise:
  • Policy in Other Countries
  • Civic Engagement
  • Immigration
  • Race & Ethnicity

Connect with Gunther

About Gunther

Peck's research focuses on the long history of human trafficking and its relationship to the evolution of racial ideology, humanitarian intervention, and immigration policy in North America and Europe.

Contributions

No Jargon Podcast

In the News

Interview on the shifting ideas about who is considered "white" in AmericaGunther Peck, Ways and Means Podcast, October 25, 2016.
Gunther Peck quoted in Michael Wines, Stephanie Saul, and Richard Perez-Pena, "Voters Find Long Lines and a Range of Irritants, but No Outright Disruption" New York Times, November 8, 2016.
"Accepting Syrian Refugees Both Humanitarian and in Our National Interest," Gunther Peck, The News & Observer, November 23, 2015.
"Fighting the President's Falsehoods about Immigrants," Gunther Peck, The News & Observer, February 13, 2017.

Publications

"Migrant Labor and Global Commons: Transnational Subjects, Visions and Methods" International Labor and Working-Class History 85 (2014): 118-137.

Locates conceptual starting points for linking migrant workers and global commons by analyzing the work of the transnational and the commons in political conversation at the WSF and in the historiographies of immigration and the environment in North America.

"Reinventing Free Labor: Immigrant Padrones and Contract Laborers in North America, 1885-1925" The Journal of American History 83, no. 3 (1996): 848-871.

Explores how padrones such as Leon Skliris used hallmarks of "free" labor relations -- the wage contract and the right to quit -- to create an expansive system of coercive labor relations in the North American West between 1885 and 1925.

"Article Navigation The Nature of Labor: Fault Lines and Common Ground in Environmental and Labor History" Environmental History 11, no. 2 (2006): 212-238.

Discusses geographies of labor, which elucidate not only how nonhuman nature and human work have historically become alienated, but also how they have inspired mutually defining visions of redeemed nature and labor, from the 1830s to the present.

"Migrant Labor and Global Commons: Transnational Subjects, Visions, and Methods" International Labor and Working-Class History 85 (2014): 118-137.

Explores the analytical advantages of linking migrant workers to global commons. Locates the conceptual starting points for linking migrant workers and global commons by analyzing the work of the transnational and the commons in political conversation and in th historiographies of immigration and the environment in North America.

Reinventing Free Labor: Padrones and Immigrant Workers in the North American West, 1885-1930 (Cambridge University Press, 2000).

Argues that padrones were not primitive men but rather thoroughly modern entrepreneurs who used corporations, the labor contract, and the right to quit to create far-flung networks. Analyzes how immigrant workers emancipated themselves using the tools of padrone power to their own advantage.