Stan Oklobdzija, from https://polisci.ucsd.edu/_images/Stan%20Oklobdzija.jpg

Stan Nguyen Oklobdzija

PhD Candidate in Political Science, University of California, San Diego
Chapter Member: California SSN, San Diego SSN
Areas of Expertise:
  • U.S. Elections
  • Law & Courts
  • Social Movements
  • Revitalizing U.S. Democracy

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About Stan

Oklobdzija's research focuses on campaign finance law and money in politics in both state and federal elections, as well as political parties, state politics and election law. Overarching themes in Oklobdzija's writings include interest group behavior, political parties, campaign finance disclosure and how candidates for office raise money.

Contributions

Publications

"Public Positions, Private Giving: Dark Money and Political Donors in the Digital Age" Research & Politics 6, no. 1 (2019).

Makes use of the only publicly available donor list for a dark money group in existence today — that of "Americans for Job Security," who contributed $11 million to two conservative-leaning ballot initiative campaigns in California during the 2012 elections. Finds a strong liberal tilt of donors to Americans for Job Security — indicating a social pressure motivation behind concealing one's donations via a dark money group. Shows disclosure laws have an effect on donor's calculus to contribute to a political cause.

"Closing Down and Cashing In: Extremism and Political Fundraising" State Politics & Policy Quarterly 17, no. 2 (2016): 201-224.

Shows how politically polarizing events can bear financial dividends for extremist politicians. Reveals that polarizing events such as California’s perennial budget impasses can create strong incentives to prolong political discord by extremists.

"Dark Parties: Citizens United, Independent-Expenditure Networks and the Evolution of Political Parties," University of California, San Diego, June 3, 2018.

Investigates pathways for anonymous giving that emerged from the Citizens United decision and how those pathways allowed more ideologically motivated groups to aggressively challenge more established factions of political parties in ways previously unfeasible. Reveals how changes in campaign finance law empowered these more extreme groups while hobbling efforts of more moderate party factions.