Profile picture for user lindsey.tonya

Tonya Lindsey

Professor of Sociology and Senior Researcher, California State University, Chico
Chapter Member: Sacramento SSN
Areas of Expertise:
  • Aging
  • Jobs & Workers
  • Women
  • Race & Ethnicity

Connect with Tonya

About Tonya

Lindsey's research focuses on an array of policy areas relevant to California's decision makers: gender equity, employment, demographics, race and corrections, media, and any policy areas where requests come in. She has methodological expertise using qualitative and quantitative methods to answer many different kinds of research questions. Lindsey's writings include subgroups, aging, and health; subgroups, aging, and economic indicators; women on corporate boards; the gender pay gap across contexts such as media; LGBTQ veterans; unlawful detainer; race in California prisons for men; and media ownership.

Lindsey works as a part-time lecturer with California State University, Chico while also serving the State of California as a full-time researcher for the California Research Bureau, the State Library's research unit, where she fields private research requests for the State's Legislators, Governor, and other constitutional officers and their staff. She has also served on assignment with the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls Pay Equity Task Force as a Senior Research Consultant and is currently volunteering locally to establish a Sacramento County Commission on the Status of Women and Girls.

Contributions

Veterans' Discharge Paperwork: LGBT Veterans Say Change Is Needed

Women on Corporate Boards: Increasing in California but Still Underrepresented

Publications

"Interim Report of the California Pay Equity Task Force," California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, April 1, 2017.

Works to support making the sound implementation of the nation's strongest pay equity law a priority by creating a Pay Equity Task Force. Aims to create practical, thorough, and widely applicable guidelines for proactive compliance.

"Women on Corporate Boards: Increasing in California but Still Underrepresented," (with Amanda Kimball), California Research Bureau, January 1, 2016.

Describes international, national, and California programs to increase the number of women board directors, analyzes women directors by location and industry, and offers options California could undertake to increase women's representation on corporate boards.

"Veterans' Discharge Paperwork: LGBT Veterans Say Change is Needed," California Research Bureau, September 1, 2015.

Discusses how California is home to the largest number of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) veterans in the country — more than double the next closest state. Explains that when these service members left active duty military services, the Department of Defense issued them discharge papers that characterized their military service. Highlights how, for LGBT veterans, discharge papers reflecting outdated gender identities and outdated policies — such as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" —  can cause a loss of access to earned military benefits and services. 

"Psychosocial and Economic Health of Older Asian Pacific Islanders in California," California Research Bureau, May 1, 2014.

Presents information about mental and economic health of older Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs). Finds that a larger percentage of APIs experienced less social connection in some ways and more economic insecurity than other Californians.

"Californians in Media Occupations: Representation and Income Parity," California Research Bureau, December 1, 2013.

Presents demographic information about Californians in media occupations, describes the representation of women and men in each occupation, and compares their median personal incomes to their representation. Finds that, where only one of the studied occupations exhibits parity in both representation and income, most of the occupations have a disparity between women and men's representation and incomes.

"'It'll Never Happen': Racial Integration in California Men's Prisons" Justice Research and Policy 11, no. 1 (2009): 77-103.

Reveals patterns in the willingness of inmates to racially integrate. Suggests that, contrary to inmates' and officers' beliefs, race category is not a significant predictor of inmates' willingness to integrate. Shows that inmates with safety concerns and those who are older are more willing to participate in integration and gang members are less willing to do so. Discusses how the results point to the importance of analyses that include those processed in the criminal justice system. Provides important evidence that can inform criminal justice policy and practice.