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Gernot Wagner

Clinical Associate Professor of Environmental Studies, New York University
Areas of Expertise:
  • Environment & Energy
  • Science & Technology

About Gernot

Wagner's research focuses on pricing climate risk and on solar geoengineering. Wagner is a climate economist focused on climate risk as well as on climate and energy policy. Wagner was previously the founding executive director of Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program. Wagner also served for almost a decade at Environmental Defense Fund, most recently as lead senior economist and member of its leadership council. Wagner is the co-author, with Harvard's Martin Weitzman, of Climate Shock (Princeton, 2015), a Top 15 Financial Times McKinsey Business Book of the Year.

Contributions

Publications

Geoengineering: The Gamble (Polity, forthcoming, 2020).

States that it is not if but when the world will look to solar geoengineering in a last-ditch effort to cool the planet.

"Applying Asset Pricing Theory to Calibrate the Price of Climate Risk," (with Kent D. Daniel and Robert B. Litterman), National Bureau of Economic Research, October 2018.

Finds a calibration that is in contrast to most modeled carbon price paths. Suggests a high optimal CO2 price today that is expected to decline over time.

"The Rebound Effect and Energy Efficiency Policy " (with Kenneth Gillingham and David Rapson). Review of Environmental Economics and Policy 10, no. 1 (Winter 2016): 68-88.

Finds that though the energy efficiency rebound effect is real, it is also largely a distraction.

"Energy Policy: Push Renewables to Spur Carbon Pricing" (with Tomas Kåberger, Susanna Olai, Michael Oppenheimer, Katherine Rittenhouse, and Thomas Sterner). Nature (2015): 27-29.

Notes that carbon pricing is but one tool to help decarbonize the global economy.

Climate Shock (with Martin L. Weitzman) (Princeton University Press, 2015).

Notes that what we know about climate change is bad, but what we do not know is potentially much worse. Notes that climate policy is risk management.

But Will the Planet Notice? How Smart Economics Can Save the World. (Hill & Want/Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, 2011).

Examines how policy, not individual action, will save the planet.