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Katherine Durante

Assistant Professor, Nevada State College
Chapter Member: Nevada SSN

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About Katherine

Dr. Durante's research focuses on racial and ethnic inequality in the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on drugs and society, punishment and social control, and quantitative methods. Overarching themes in Dr. Durante's writings include examining how the war on drugs and other ostensibly race-neutral policies and practices contribute to disparate sentencing. Dr. Durante recently served as the Vice-Chair for the Law & Society Division of the Society for the Study of Social Problems. She is a correspondent for NV-CURE and is starting a term on the Citizens Review Board for LVMPD, reviewing citizen complaints against the police.

In the News

"Locking People in Cages and Family Separation Is Nothing New in Nevada Copy," Katherine Durante, Opinion, The Nevada Independent, July 24, 2018.

Publications

"An Examination of the Impact of COVID-19 on U.S. Prisons and Jails,"

Provides an overview and assessment of how COVID-19 is impacting, and will continue to impact people incarcerated and the people who work in jails, prisons, and detention facilities. We make recommendations to correctional administrators and policy makers for mitigating the negative impacts that COVID-19 is having on these marginalized populations. Note that this report is written for an audience of practitioners and policy makers. 

, Correctional Health Care Report, forthcoming.
" A Racial Inequality in Prison Admissions for Drug Offenses: An Investigation of County- and State-Level Predictors. (Under Review)," (with A. Morczek),

Findings indicate that counties with larger Black populations, that are more politically conservative, that have increased levels of segregation, that have less Black-White income inequality, and that are located in the South have less Black-White racial inequality in prison admissions for drug offenses.Findings indicate that counties with larger Black populations, that are more politically conservative, that have increased levels of segregation, that have less Black-White income inequality, and that are located in the South have less Black-White racial inequality in prison admissions for drug offenses.

, forthcoming.
"Racial Inequality in Prison Admissions for Drug Offenses: An Investigation of County- and State-Level Predictors," (with A. Morczek),

African Americans and Latinos receive longer sentences than White offenders when controlling for individual- and county-level factors. Larger percentages of Black and Latino residents is not associated with increased sentence lengths. Increased macro-level socioeconomic inequality and political climate are not significant predictors of longer sentence lengths for Black and Latino offenders. Findings indicate that race and ethnicity continue to be salient predictors of punishment, with minorities.

, Forthcoming.

African Americans and Latinos receive longer sentences than White offenders when controlling for individual- and county-level factors. Larger percentages of Black and Latino residents is not associated with increased sentence lengths. Increased macro-level socioeconomic inequality and political climate are not significant predictors of longer sentence lengths for Black and Latino offenders. Findings indicate that race and ethnicity continue to be salient predictors of punishment, with minorities.

"Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Prison Admissions Across Counties: An Evaluation of Racial/Ethnic Threat, Socioeconomic Inequality, and Political Climate Explanations" Sage Journals 10, no. 2 (2017): 176.

Findings suggest that Black-White disparity in prison admissions is lower in counties with a larger percentage of Black residents, while Latino-White disparity in prison admissions is greater in counties with a larger percentage of Latino residents. A higher percentage of Republican voters and being located in the South are both associated with less disparity in prison admissions.