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Kristine Ria Hearld

Assistant Professor of Health Services Administration, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Chapter Member: Alabama SSN
Areas of Expertise:
  • Mental Health
  • Health Care
  • Reproductive Health
  • Health Care Reform

Connect with Kristine

About Kristine

Ria's primary research has focused on health care of vulnerable populations, global health, maternal and child health, health disparities, and mental health outcomes. Her research has benefited from sociological and economic perspectives gained through training in an interdisciplinary program, and from six years of experience working in the private sector as a consultant to physicians associated with hospital systems. Prior to joining UAB, she worked for Medical Advantage Group in East Lansing, Michigan, where she served as a consultant and manager for a 200-member independent physician association and a 140-member physician-hospital organization. 

Contributions

Challenging Assumptions about the Use of Contraception by U.S. Muslim Women

  • Kristine Ria Hearld

Publications

"Transgender Women's Experiences with Stigma, Trauma, and Attempted Suicide in the Dominican Republic" (with Kristine Ria Hearld, Adrienne N. Milner, Rebecca Charow, Elaine M. McGlaughlin, Mayra Rodriguez-Lauzurique, Santo Rosario, and Robert Paulino-Ramirez). Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior (2017).

Examines the relationships between stigma, trauma, and suicide attempts in a national sample of transgender women from the Dominican Republic.

"Depression in Racial and Ethnic Minorities: The Impact of Nativity and Discrimination" (with Kristine Ria Hearld and Daniel Chavez-Yenter). Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities 2, no. 1 (2015): 34-42.

Examines factors associated with lifetime major depressive disorder in racial and ethnic minorities residing in the United States, with an emphasis on the impact of nativity, discrimination, and health lifestyle behaviors.

"Muslim Women's Use of Contraception in the United States" (with Kristine Ria Hearld and Jami Anderson). Reproductive Health 15, no. 1 (2018).

Examines American Muslim women's contraception utilization patterns. Suggests that American Muslim women's contraception utilization patterns share certain similarities with both American women in general and disadvantaged racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States, implying that factors that influence American Muslim women's use of contraceptives are possibly countervailing and likely multifaceted.

"Transgender Women's Drug Use in the Dominican Republic" (with Kristine Ria Hearld, Adrienne N. Milner, Elaine McGlaughlin, Rebecca Charow, Mayra Rodriguez-Lauzurique, Santo Rosario, and Robert Paulino-Ramirez). Transgender Health 2, no. 1 (2017).

Examines associations between stigma, trauma, and drug use in a national sample of transgender women from the Dominican Republic.

"Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Racial and Ethnic Minorities: A Case of Nativity and Contextual Factors" (with Kristine Ria Hearld and Daniel Chavez-Yenter). Journal of Affective Disorders 175, no. 1 (2015): 275-280.

Evaluates the relationship between minority status, contextual factors, and lifetime Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Offers practical insight into environmental factors for clinicians caring for racial and ethnic minorities diagnoses with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

"Muslim Women's Experiences with Stigma, Abuse, and Depression: Results of a Sample Study Conducted in the United States" (with Kristine Ria Hearld). Journal of Women's Health 26, no. 5 (2017).

Explores associations between internalized stigma, exposure to physical abuse, experiences with sexual abuse, and depression in Muslim women residing in the United States.

"Transgender Female Sex Workers; HIV Knowledge, Experienced Stigma, and Condom Use in the Dominican Republic" (with Kristine Ria Hearld, Julia Hasbun, Rebecca Charow, Santo Rosario, Louise Tillotson, Elaine McGlaughlin, and John Waters). Public Library of Science One (2017).

Assesses associations between their HIV knowledge, experienced stigma, and condom use across three partner types.