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Taylor Shelton

Assistant Professor of Geography and GIS, Mississippi State University
Chapter Member: Mississippi SSN
Areas of Expertise:
  • Public Health

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About Taylor

Shelton’s research focuses on using mapping and data visualization to develop alternative understandings of urban social and spatial inequalities, with a particular focus on issues of housing, segregation, mobility and neighborhood change.

In the News

Taylor Shelton quoted on evictions in Lexington by Beth Musgrave, "In 12 Years, 43,000 Renters Were Evicted from Lexington Homes. Why That Matters" Lexington Herald-Leader, October 13, 2017.
Taylor Shelton quoted on eviction filings in Fayette District Court by Beth Musgrave, "More Renters are Evicted in This Lexington Neighborhood than Any Other" Lexington Herald-Leader, October 13, 2017.

Publications

"Rethinking the RECAP: Mapping the Relational Geographies of Concentrated Poverty and Affluence in Lexington, Kentucky" Urban Geography (forthcoming).

Analyzes the growth of both racially concentrated poverty and affluence in Lexington, Kentucky. Demonstrates that while both of these problems have been growing, they are fundamentally connected through networks of property ownership and landlordism that channel wealth from poor neighborhoods to more affluent ones.

"Locked Out: Foreclosure, Eviction, and Housing Instability in Lexington, 2005-2016," Lexington Fair Housing Council, 2017.

Report prepared for the Lexington Fair Housing Council on foreclosure and eviction in Lexington from 2005-2016. Demonstrates that while residential foreclosures have fallen back below pre-crisis levels, residential evictions have remained relatively stable over time, concentrated in a small number of neighborhoods and among a relatively small number of landlords who own many properties.

"Mapping a Segregated City: The Growth of Racially/Ethnically Concentrated Poverty and Affluence in Lexington, 1970-2014," Lexington Fair Housing Council, 2017.

Report prepared for the Lexington Fair Housing Council on the growth of concentrated poverty and affluence in Lexington from 1970-2014. Demonstrates that while both racially concentrated poverty and affluence have been growing, concentrated affluence remains a much larger and more widespread problem within the city.

"Social Media and the City: Rethinking Urban Socio-Spatial Inequality Using User-Generated Geographic Information" Landscape and Urban Planning 142 (2015): 198-211.

Analyzes two years of geotagged tweets from Louisville, Kentucky in order to explore popular spatial imaginaries of the '9th Street Divide.' Demonstrates that while the city’s predominantly poor and black West End is usually thought to be separated from the rest of the city, it is actually more affluent whites from the city’s East End who are more spatially constrained in their everyday movements through the city.